• Last spring my garden is alive after along winter sleep. Plenty of work to be done. Planted many vegetable seedlings grown in the greenhouse. Lettuce, carrot (sowed direct into the ground), collard, kale, Swiss chard, corn, pumpkin, potato, beet, summer squash, tomato and leek. The garden is doing great. Just yesterday I harvested several zuccinni. Right away I made zuccinni chocolate cake. It is always a joy to be able to harvest from your own garden and cook with the vegetable that you grow yourself. Gardening is an excellent exercise for body and mind. Regardless how big or small your garden is.
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Dividing Irises

This year I need to divide my irises.  They have grown too dense so dividing them is very important.  Among perennial ornamentals, irises are easy to grow favorites with many flower gardeners.  Although easy to maintain, iris clumps do need some extra attention every few years for best performance.  Divide iris clumps every 3 or 4 years.  The original iris plant or rhizome expands puts out new shoots and gradually becomes so crowded that it runs out of room and nutrients.  By dividing the clump, each iris plant or rhizome with attached foliage can be replanted by itself, thus increasing the beauty of the yard as well as giving the iris new life.

Yellow Bearded Iris

 

 When dividing, cut sections apart with a sharp knife.  Each portion saved should have a section of fleshy root (the rhizome) with either a strong bud or fan of leaves.  Discard all but the most healthy sections.  Before replanting, set the rhizomes in a shaded place for a few hours to dry the cut surfaces.  A bulb dust can be used to protect the cut sections from decay.

Replant the sections into fertile, well-drained soil.  Plant the rhizomes with the attached roots spread over a mound in the planting hole.  Make the top of the planted rhizome even with ground level or slightly lower.  Fill and soak dirt in and around the roots. Keep the newly planted rhizomes watered regularly through the hottest part of the summer.  Also, feeding the iris with a small amount of low nitrogen complete fertilizer in late summer to help develop buds for next spring.  Organic gardeners can use blood meal or well composted manures.

Happy Gardening !

 

Dutch Iris

 

Bearded Iris

 
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