• Last spring my garden is alive after along winter sleep. Plenty of work to be done. Planted many vegetable seedlings grown in the greenhouse. Lettuce, carrot (sowed direct into the ground), collard, kale, Swiss chard, corn, pumpkin, potato, beet, summer squash, tomato and leek. The garden is doing great. Just yesterday I harvested several zuccinni. Right away I made zuccinni chocolate cake. It is always a joy to be able to harvest from your own garden and cook with the vegetable that you grow yourself. Gardening is an excellent exercise for body and mind. Regardless how big or small your garden is.
    Thank you for coming by.

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My father’s orchid collection

Orchid, exotic flower from the Far East.  Exquisite, dainty, fragile, simply gorgeous.  My late father an orchid enthusiast had well over 100+ plants in his collection.  As I am the photographer of the family I captured these beauty every time I am in his garden.

Caring orchid in the tropic which is their environment is easy but in another part of the world they need a lot of pampering.  More important humidity, warm temperature, no soil needed just add bark in their container.  In the wild orchid grows latched on to trees, they absorbed food through their leaves.

I remember as a child growing up in the tropic, when my mother needed vanilla she would go to the garden and harvested the slender dark bean.  Fresh vanilla has a strong distinctive taste.  So delicious taste better than those bottled vanilla extract.   These photos taken all with film Canon SLR  macro lens.  Enjoy these exotic photos of Orchid the jungle Queen.

 

Tiger Orchid

 

Cymbidium

Cymbidium

 

Catleya

Catleya

 

Pink orchid

Pink orchid

 

 

Wild orchid

 

 

 

Garden Hints for February

Looking around the garden after the winter storm,  lots of work to be done.  Strawberry plants needs to be pruned.  I found this garden information a help.

  • Have soil test performed on garden plot to determine nutrient needs.
  • Test leftover seeds by placing a few of each in a damp-rolled paper towel.  Keep in a warm place for five days and see how many germinate. If none sprout, you need a new supply of seeds.
  • All out slug and snail control begins as new shoots of annuals and perennials appear.
  • Prune clematis, and other Vining ornamentals.
  • Plant seed flats of cole crops (cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli, Brussels sprouts).
  • Good time to plant fruit trees and deciduous shrubs.
  • Delayed dormant sprays of lime sulfur for fruit and deciduous trees and shrubs.
  • Dig and divide irises that are at least five years old.  Give extra to friend or enlarge your plantings.
  • Give rhubab clumbs a mulch of manure or a complete fertilizer to stimulate growth.
  • Consider making a hotbed or cold-frame for growing transplants.
  • Repair winter damage on trees and shrubs.
  • Prune roses.  Now is a good time to plant roses and new rose varieties.
  • As soil warms and earthworms become more active, so do the moles.  Trapping is the bes control.
  • If weather permits and soil is dry enough, spade or till garden areas for planting later.
  • Make planting plan for your vegetable garden;  include vegetable names, planting location, row spacing, plant spacing, succession crops.
  • Spade or plow down cover crops or other organic matter.

Happy Gardening !

January Garden Hints

Pacific Northwest with its temperate weather gardening can begin early.  Except of course on higher elevation.

  • Check with local retail garden or nursery stores for seed and seed catalogs and begin planing this year’s vegetable garden.
  • Have soil test performed on garden plot.
  • Where soil is well-drained and workable, plant peas and sweet peas.  Green Arrow shelling pea is my favorite.  Sugar Snap. 
  • Too early to start seeds for vegetable transplants.
  • Spray cherry trees for bacterial canker;  use copper fungicide with a spreader.
  • Mid-January second spray of peach trees with approved fungicides to combat peach leaf curl.
  • Plant deciduous fruit and shade trees.
  • Dormant sprays of lime sulfur or copper fungicide on roses for general disease control.
  • Watch for field mice damage on lower trunks of trees and shrubs.  Control with approved baits, weed control and traps.
  • Moss appearing in lawn means too much shade, poor drainage, low fertility, soil compaction or thin strand of grass.
  • Gather branches of quince, forsythia, flowering cherries and bring inside to force early bloom.
  • Monitor house plants for correct watering, feeding;  guard against insect infestations, clean dust from leaves.

Happy gardening…..

Winter Wonders

The Orchard looking west.

Strolling through the snow-covered garden with camera in hand ready to capture the beauty mother nature has created. 

 Looking around the garden,  discarded snow-covered logs stacked like a sentinel under a bare maple tree.  Frozen branches beckoning to be admired.  Tree moss swaying precariously on a tree branch.  Ice particles frozen on a birch dainty limbs.  The orchard desolate waiting for spring to arrive.  Snow is everywhere, even the pond behind the house is frozen.   Serenity is in the air,  waiting for a miracle to happen.   Indeed, an  enchanting winter wonders .

Copyright Images”

Frozen hazelnut catkins and spider web.

 

Frosted English ivy

 

Snow covered old logs

 
 

Frosted maple leave on a piece of wood

 

Frozen tree moss

 

Snow covered frozen pond

 

Frosted Indian plum blossoms

 

Japanese dwarf pine

 

Frozen birch trees

 

Into the snow......

 
 
 
 

Gardening Calendar In The Month Of June

Woo hoo, finally the rain stopped.  I thought spring will never leave Oregon and today is the first day of summer.  The long-range forecast is for good weather, so I will take the opportunity to do some yard work.  More transplanting vegetable seedlings,  pruning the flower shrubs, mowing the lawn, etc.  I found by following a to do list is quite helpful.  Here it is…..

  • Apply fertilizer to lawns
  • Control root weevils in rhododendrons, azaleas, primroses, and other ornamentals.  Use beneficial nematodes if soil temperature is above 55F.
  • Remove seed pods after blooms have dropped from rhododendron, azaleas.
  • Prune lilacs, forsythia, rhododendrons, and azaleas after blooming.
  • Use an inch or two of organic mulches or sawdust or composted leaves to conserve soil moisture.
  • Pick ripe strawberries regularly to avoid fruit rotting diseases.
  • Control garden weeds by pulling, hoeing or mulching.
  • Thin apples, pears, and peaches when fruit is as big around as nickle.  Expect normal June drop of fruit not pollinated.
  • Late this month, began to monitor for late blight on tomatoes.
  • If  indicated, spray cherries at a weekly intervals for fruit fly.
  • Move houseplants outside for cleaning, grooming, repotting and summer growth.
  • Make sure raised beds receive enough water for plants to stay free of drought stress.
  • Learn to identify beneficial insects such as, ladybugs, ground beetles, rove beetles, spiders and wasps.
  • Blossoms on squash and cucumbers begin to drop, nothing to worry about.

Happy Gardening

Flowers to convey your feelings

 

Roses is not the only flowers with special meanings.  Other variety flowers have the same meanings just like it.  In the Victorian era they would use flowers to convey their feelings. 

  • Lavender             Devotion
  • Calla Lily              Elegance
  • Rosemary            Remembrance
  • Yellow Tulip        Memory     
  • Clematis                Unchanged for eternity
  • Pink Hydrangea Remembrance
  • Red rose                Love, passion, respect, courage
  • White rose            Innocence, purity, secrecy, reverence
  • Purple Iris            Promise
  • Yellow Rose         Joy, friendship, freedom, Highest mark of distinction
  • Sweet Pea              Meet me
  • White Iris               My compliments
  • Blue Salvia             Thinking of you
  • White Carnation  Admiration
  • Cream Rose            Thoughtfulness, charm, graciousness
  • Green Hydrangea Devotion
  • Pink rose                   Happiness, gratitude, appreciation, admiration
  • Ranunculus              Dazzled by your charm
  • Wisteria                      Welcome, steadfast, adventure, playfulness

Happy gardening…….

Remembering My Garden Companion

Spencer was his name,  a Labrador Retriever trained to retrieve motionless ducks in the water.  But we never used him to retrieved ducks, instead Spencer became my constant companion everywhere, including the garden.

He loved to roam around the large garden, especially under a huge old maple tree.  Once awhile a squirrel would challenge Spencer for a hide and seek, which of course made him excited.  Barking furiously at the squirrel, running around the tree chasing the elusive creature until he tired of it.  Feeling exhausted and thirsty, he trotted straight to the pond for a drink.   Then Spencer find a peaceful spot to rest until the next adventure .    He also enjoyed chasing butterflies and small birds too, of course he never was able to catched any of them.  They were to quick for Spencer.

When the fruit season arrived, Spencer was over the moon.  Lots of food to eat.  He would sniff each fruit for ripeness.  One apple or pear was not enough, he ate many of them until he could not eat any more.

Spencer was a gentle, sweet, loving dog,  he enjoyed car rides and meeting people.  He was a people dog.  Gradually old age stole all his exuberance.  No more chasing  anything his energy was not there anymore.  On January 2000, my beloved garden companion heart gave out.  I felt heartbroken lost a friend who gave me joy everyday of my life.  My husband and I decided under the old maple tree would be a suitable final resting place for Spencer.  He would loved that as this area was his favorite playground.

Until we meet again……….

Here is a lovely poem to remember my garden companion.

RAINBOW BRIDGE  (author unknown)

Just this side of heaven is a place called Rainbow Bridge.

When an animal dies that has been especially close to someone here, that pet goes to Rainbow Bridge.  There are meadows and hills for all of our special friends so the can run and play together.  There is plenty of food, water and sunshine, and our friends are warm and comfortable.

All the animals who had been ill and old are restored to health and vigor; those who were hurt or maimed are made whole and strong again, just as we remember them in our dreams of days and times gone by.  The animals are happy and content, except for one small thing;  they each miss someone very special to them, who had to be left behind.

They all run and play together, but the day comes when one suddenly stops and looks into the distance.  His bright eyes are intent;  His eager body quivers.  Suddenly he begins to run from the group, flying over the green grass, his legs carrying him faster and faster.

You have been spotted, and when you and your special friend finally meet, you cling together in joyous reunion, never to be parted again.  The happy kisses rain upon your face;  your hands again caress the beloved head, and you look once more into the trusting eyes of your pet, so long gone from your life but never absent rom your heart.

Then you cross Rainbow Bridge together………

Source:

http://www.petloss.com

Dexter, our beloved Labrador age 11 passed away on September 27, 2010.   He spent one year in the Labrador foster home because no one want to adopt him.  We came along to adopt Dexter who was 8 month old, full of energy, playful, with a enormous appetite. 

We gave Dexter lots of love and a wonderful life, in spite of his health condition toward later in life.   The orchard was his favorite place to roam.   When the fruit trees heavy with apples, pears, plums and cherries,  Dexter would trot from tree to another looking for ripe fruit by sniffing.  Then, he pulled the fruit with such force the branch shook violently.  Naturally several would fall to the ground and he would gobbled them up too.  Harvest season was his favorite time of the year.  Not only eating was his passion, chasing squirrels, birds, occasional deer who came close to his territory.    He was an adventurous dog, enjoy roaming around the property.   We burried Dexter  near our other Labrador,  Spencer who passed away 11 years ago.

We gave you a wonderful stable home,   in return you gave us joy.  Have a good journey Dexter,  we will meet again……….