• Last spring my garden is alive after along winter sleep. Plenty of work to be done. Planted many vegetable seedlings grown in the greenhouse. Lettuce, carrot (sowed direct into the ground), collard, kale, Swiss chard, corn, pumpkin, potato, beet, summer squash, tomato and leek. The garden is doing great. Just yesterday I harvested several zuccinni. Right away I made zuccinni chocolate cake. It is always a joy to be able to harvest from your own garden and cook with the vegetable that you grow yourself. Gardening is an excellent exercise for body and mind. Regardless how big or small your garden is.
    Thank you for coming by.

  • Categories

  • Blog Visitors

    • 3,556 hits
  • Archives

  • Mistyrose Design and Photography

  • October 2017
    S M T W T F S
    « Jun    
    1234567
    891011121314
    15161718192021
    22232425262728
    293031  
  • Help Animals In Shelters with one click

  • AddThis

    Bookmark and Share
  • Top Posts

My father’s orchid collection

Orchid, exotic flower from the Far East.  Exquisite, dainty, fragile, simply gorgeous.  My late father an orchid enthusiast had well over 100+ plants in his collection.  As I am the photographer of the family I captured these beauty every time I am in his garden.

Caring orchid in the tropic which is their environment is easy but in another part of the world they need a lot of pampering.  More important humidity, warm temperature, no soil needed just add bark in their container.  In the wild orchid grows latched on to trees, they absorbed food through their leaves.

I remember as a child growing up in the tropic, when my mother needed vanilla she would go to the garden and harvested the slender dark bean.  Fresh vanilla has a strong distinctive taste.  So delicious taste better than those bottled vanilla extract.   These photos taken all with film Canon SLR  macro lens.  Enjoy these exotic photos of Orchid the jungle Queen.

 

Tiger Orchid

 

Cymbidium

Cymbidium

 

Catleya

Catleya

 

Pink orchid

Pink orchid

 

 

Wild orchid

 

 

 

Advertisements

Backyard Harvest

Summer of 2010 was not a good gardening year here in McKenzie valley, Oregon.  Long wet spring weather, delayed planting, not enough warm temperature.  Tomatoes, pumpkins, peppers all suffered except those cool weather variety vegetables did well.  Such as carrot, lettuce, collard, beetroot, potatoes, leeks.   I harvested a basketful of each vegetables which was not bad at all.  Here are the list of vegetables variety that I grow in 2010.

Shelling peas – green arrow, so prolific with a good pea taste.  Excellent for freezing.

Carrot – Chantenay red color, good flavor with deep orange color.  Good for freezing.  Avoid sowing carrot in wet soil, it will not make straight smooth roots.  Use excess nitrogen will cause splits, forks and hairy roots.

Leeks – a staple in my garden.  Kilimia leek, a summer leek fast growing and tolerates light frost.

Broccoli –  a big disappointment.  The reason was the growing site did not get enough morning sunlight, hence small broccoli head.  Next time a different area with lots of sun.

Lettuce were the best, thrive in cool temperature.  My favorite are, Red Deer Tongue, slow to bolt, mild flavor, tender has red tinged leaves.  Tom Thumb small plants 3″-4″ ball.  A perfect single serving.  I grow this in the greenhouse slow to grow but at least fresh lettuce available through winter.

Collard – also a staple in my garden.  champion variety, dark green and large, have a cabbage like leaves.  Delicious flavor.  I left these growing in the garden through winter.  They survived snow, frost, cold and rain and still growing until spring where they will produce yellow dainty flower which will turn into seed when left alone.

Beetroot – like rich soil, moist and deep.  Use compost or well-rotted manure several days before planting.  Harvest them when reach their desired size.  Ruby Queen variety bought in gardening center, germinated well, good flavor.  I tried many other beetroot, this variety grow well in my garden.

I hope 2011 will be a succesful growing season.

Happy Gardening……

Cherry Plum Tree

Because of a long wet spring,  the cherry-plum trees did not produce as many fruit this year.  a disappointment for me, no jam and chutney to make.   

In the early part of spring the trees were covered with beautiful white blossoms.  So I assumed there will be plenty of fruit.  Well, not at all because lack of bees to pollinate the blossoms.  I discovered, the bees only come by when is warm and sunny.  Sometime, though,  cloudy days the bees will pollinate.  But is seldom happen.

The above image is a cherry-plum fruit.  Fruit size similar to cherry, appearance of a plum including the interior, pit similar to cherry.  The fruit has a plum taste.  Botanical name is Prunus Cerasifera also known as Myrobalan plum.  Latin name Rosaceae.

Cherry – Plum tree in full bloom, the flowers attract bees and when standing near the tree the sound of bees buzzing is awesome. Cerasifera in Latin name means “bearing cherry like fruits”

Happy Gardening…….

Flowers to convey your feelings

 

Roses is not the only flowers with special meanings.  Other variety flowers have the same meanings just like it.  In the Victorian era they would use flowers to convey their feelings. 

  • Lavender             Devotion
  • Calla Lily              Elegance
  • Rosemary            Remembrance
  • Yellow Tulip        Memory     
  • Clematis                Unchanged for eternity
  • Pink Hydrangea Remembrance
  • Red rose                Love, passion, respect, courage
  • White rose            Innocence, purity, secrecy, reverence
  • Purple Iris            Promise
  • Yellow Rose         Joy, friendship, freedom, Highest mark of distinction
  • Sweet Pea              Meet me
  • White Iris               My compliments
  • Blue Salvia             Thinking of you
  • White Carnation  Admiration
  • Cream Rose            Thoughtfulness, charm, graciousness
  • Green Hydrangea Devotion
  • Pink rose                   Happiness, gratitude, appreciation, admiration
  • Ranunculus              Dazzled by your charm
  • Wisteria                      Welcome, steadfast, adventure, playfulness

Happy gardening…….

April Gardening In Oregon

Fertilize the lawn and let spring rains carry the fertilizer into the soil.

Bait for slugs, clean up hiding places for slugs, sowbugs and millipedes.

Do not cut foliage of spring flowering bulbs for bouquet.

Prune and shape spring blooming shrubs and trees after blossoms fade.

Prepare garden soil for spring planting.  Mix generous amount of organic materials and other amendments.

Apply commercial fertilizers, manure or compost to cane and trailing berries.

Control rose diseases such as black spot and powdery mildew.  Prune ornamentals for air circulation.

Cut and remove weeds from near the garden to remove sources of plant virus diseases.

Spray for apple scab, cherry brown rot.

Prepare raised beds in areas where cold soils and poor drainage are a continuing problem.

Plant these vegetables, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, chard, leeks, peas, radishes, rhubarb, spinach turnips.

Cherry-Plum Tree in The Spring


Sunshine, blue sky, wispy white clouds here and there.  Robins chasing the worms and blue jay searching for twigs to build a nest in nearby tree.   Daffodils, crocuses have emerged from their winter slumber.  Spring is in the air.  I love spring everything is fresh and new. 

Another sign of spring is the cherry plum trees in my garden.  They are always the first to bloom showing their magnificent white flowers.  Bees attracted to their strong scent.  I stood one sunny day in front of the trees and listen the bees buzzing along feasting on the cherry plum blossoms it was an awesome sound.   Robins like to eat the fruit too, ripen in late July through August.  To cover trees with bird net it is impossible.  There are plenty of fruit to share around for human and birds. 

Latin  for cherry plum,  prunus cerasifera or the myrobalan cherry tree.  A deciduous tree belongs to the rose family,  (Rosaceae in Latin).  Will grow from 15 to 30 feet.  The cherry plum in my garden is about 25 feet with a spread of 30 feet.  These trees are good for screening neighborhood eyesores.  The flower is about 3/4 to 1 inch with 5 petals.  Fruit size similar to cherry with characteristic of a plum.  Cherry plum taste of a combination cherry and plum.  It has a pit like cherry.  Fruit color is deep red.  My cherry plum tree leaves are deep green, some say they are purple, this probably came from different cultivation.  In autumn the leaves turn reddish-purple.  

Grown in acidic soil, might also be able to grow in mild alkaline soil.   Cherry plum tree prefers full sun and moist soil which is suitable growing condition in Oregon.  The seeds dispersed by wild life.  Walking through my property occasionally I found cherry plum seedlings.  I would dig them out and transplanted in a different place.  A slow growing tree I should say. 

I like eating cherry plum picked fresh from the tree or make them into jam, chutneys, pies and cobblers.  Use recipe as you are making cherry pie.  Last year I made cherry plum jam and taste wonderful. 

  

Cherry-Plum blossoms at its peak.

 

  

Happy  Gardening  

Forsythia Welcoming Spring

 

Forsythia with its bright yellow flowers like a beacon in the dead of winter.    A deciduous shrub.  Branches can be forced indoor blooming in winter.  Tolerate most soils, likes sun, moderate feeding. I rarely feed the forsythia and yet they thrive beautifully. Height 8 feet to 10 feet, spread 6 feet to 8 feet.  Remove oldest branches, weak or dead wood.

 

The variety  I have is Forsythia Suspensa (weeping).  Dense upright growth, drooping vine like branches root when touch damp soil.  During winter remove the branches that took root and transplanted elsewhere.  You may use containers to plant the forsythia seedlings.

 

In summer the shrub will be a mass of green foliage.  Good for screening too.

 

Happy Gardening !

Forsythia Suspensa