• Last spring my garden is alive after along winter sleep. Plenty of work to be done. Planted many vegetable seedlings grown in the greenhouse. Lettuce, carrot (sowed direct into the ground), collard, kale, Swiss chard, corn, pumpkin, potato, beet, summer squash, tomato and leek. The garden is doing great. Just yesterday I harvested several zuccinni. Right away I made zuccinni chocolate cake. It is always a joy to be able to harvest from your own garden and cook with the vegetable that you grow yourself. Gardening is an excellent exercise for body and mind. Regardless how big or small your garden is.
    Thank you for coming by.

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My father’s orchid collection

Orchid, exotic flower from the Far East.  Exquisite, dainty, fragile, simply gorgeous.  My late father an orchid enthusiast had well over 100+ plants in his collection.  As I am the photographer of the family I captured these beauty every time I am in his garden.

Caring orchid in the tropic which is their environment is easy but in another part of the world they need a lot of pampering.  More important humidity, warm temperature, no soil needed just add bark in their container.  In the wild orchid grows latched on to trees, they absorbed food through their leaves.

I remember as a child growing up in the tropic, when my mother needed vanilla she would go to the garden and harvested the slender dark bean.  Fresh vanilla has a strong distinctive taste.  So delicious taste better than those bottled vanilla extract.   These photos taken all with film Canon SLR  macro lens.  Enjoy these exotic photos of Orchid the jungle Queen.

 

Tiger Orchid

 

Cymbidium

Cymbidium

 

Catleya

Catleya

 

Pink orchid

Pink orchid

 

 

Wild orchid

 

 

 

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Gardening Calendar In The Month Of June

Woo hoo, finally the rain stopped.  I thought spring will never leave Oregon and today is the first day of summer.  The long-range forecast is for good weather, so I will take the opportunity to do some yard work.  More transplanting vegetable seedlings,  pruning the flower shrubs, mowing the lawn, etc.  I found by following a to do list is quite helpful.  Here it is…..

  • Apply fertilizer to lawns
  • Control root weevils in rhododendrons, azaleas, primroses, and other ornamentals.  Use beneficial nematodes if soil temperature is above 55F.
  • Remove seed pods after blooms have dropped from rhododendron, azaleas.
  • Prune lilacs, forsythia, rhododendrons, and azaleas after blooming.
  • Use an inch or two of organic mulches or sawdust or composted leaves to conserve soil moisture.
  • Pick ripe strawberries regularly to avoid fruit rotting diseases.
  • Control garden weeds by pulling, hoeing or mulching.
  • Thin apples, pears, and peaches when fruit is as big around as nickle.  Expect normal June drop of fruit not pollinated.
  • Late this month, began to monitor for late blight on tomatoes.
  • If  indicated, spray cherries at a weekly intervals for fruit fly.
  • Move houseplants outside for cleaning, grooming, repotting and summer growth.
  • Make sure raised beds receive enough water for plants to stay free of drought stress.
  • Learn to identify beneficial insects such as, ladybugs, ground beetles, rove beetles, spiders and wasps.
  • Blossoms on squash and cucumbers begin to drop, nothing to worry about.

Happy Gardening

May Gardening Calendar

I have been so busy lately my blogging is slightly slow.   Here is a list of what to do in the garden for this month.

  • Fertilize rhododendron and azaleas;  remove spent blossoms.
  • Plant chrysanthemums for fall color
  • Plant dahlias in mid-May
  • Control insects in vegetables.  Control can involve hand removal, placing barrier screen over newly planted rows or spraying with appropriate materials.
  • Tiny holes in foliage and shiny, black beetles on tomato, beets, radishes, and potato indicate flea beetle attack  Treat with Neem, rotenone or use nematodes for larval stage.
  • Fertilize roses and control rose diseases such as mildew.

Prevent root maggots when planting cabbage family, onions, and carrots, by covering with row covers, screens, or by applying appropriate pesticides.

Happy Gardening !

Enchanted Moss Forest

Green moss on maple branches

Rain, rain and more rain continuously since yesterday,  with plenty of moisture makes it a suitable growing environment for moss.   Yes, all these moss images taken from my property in Oregon. 

Moss covered trees

 
Moss can be found on roof, lawn, concrete slab, decayed wood.  It is amazing how moss can attached themself on anything.  The Oregon green moss which grows on maple branches are soft to the touch.  This kind of moss are excellent for hanging basket liners and will keep all summer long.  As long as the hanging basket is kept moist.  They are easy to peel from low growing maple branches.    

Lichens

Lichen is another variety of moss that looks like a snake-skin. A thick leathery texture to the touch,  it is also good for composting.  Lichen grows on branches will not harm trees because it takes nourishment from the air rather than from the tree.  Lichen also commonly found on dead branches and limbs.  Give lichens access to the sun they will grow with little competition.  Sometime lichen will fall on the ground caused by strong wind.   

Moss are wonderful on trees.  Nature truly has created an enchanted moss forest.   

Happy Gardening……..    

Moss on abandoned log

    

     

Bearded Moss

CANADA GEESE NOT ON OUR LAWN

     

Canada geese are not welcome on our lawn.  They are a menace, heavy feeder, especially on dark green healthy grass.  They leave droppings everywhere on the lawn that created a burn like circle.  I believe this come from nitrogen in their droppings.  The lawn slope to the water edge.  So my husband decided to install a yard guard (portable fence) that comes in 50 feet rolls, 4 feet in hight.  That did the trick, no more geese foraging on our lawn.  They are lazy bird, rather ambling to the lawn than fly over it.  Watching them on the water is quite a sight .  When they sense danger, bobbing up and down their head making a clucking noise.  Signalling they are ready to fly out.  The clucking noise went into a crescendo, their web feet start to run on the water, wings spread wide,  flapping furiously and slowly they lift off.  Flying along the McKenzie river to find another grass field for foraging.    

Did you know that the gander wingspread is as much as 5 feet and his weight approaches 14 pounds, wow that is heavy.  The gander is also a fierce defender of his mate and offsprings. Their habitats are ponds, lakes rivers, freshwater, salt marshes, and grain fields.  The nest is a hollow lined with plant matter and down.  Eggs 2-12, white, incubation 25-30 days, by female only.  Gosling leave nest soon after hatching, they will stay with their parents until next spring.  Their foods are aquatic plants, grass, and grain.      

From spring to fall often I look up in the sky geese flying in their V formation males and females honking greeting each other.  A beautiful sight to be hold in spite their annoying habit of ruining our lawn with their droppings.     

Happy Gardening……    

Canada geese resting on the edge of the lawn.